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Effect of the Demographic Variables and Psychometric Properties of the Personal Well-Being Index for School Children in India

Abstract

The Personal Well-being Index-school children (PWI-SC; Cummins and Lau 2005) measures well-being of adolescents. The study aimed at validating psychometric properties for the English and the Hindi translated version of PWI-SC in Indian context. Data from 1,301 students, aged 13–18 years (mean age = 15.40 years, SD = 1.33) was collected. The English and Hindi version confirmed one-factor solution of the PWI-SC. The convergent validity was supported through positive correlations with Flourishing Scale (FS; Diener et al. 2010) and Brief Multidimensional Students Life Satisfaction Scale (BMSLSS; Huebner et al. 2004). The effect of demographic variables on different domains of PWI-SC indicated that adolescents who resided in rural areas and those who attended private school possessed a significantly higher score on PWI-SC. Well-being declined as age increased from early adolescent to middle adolescence to late adolescence. The results of this study are in agreement with the previous literature.

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Acknowledgments

This research received funding from the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), India on the “Relationship of Demographic variables, socio-cultural issues and selected psychological constructs with the positive mental health of north Indian adolescents”. This paper is a part of this project. Authors would like to thank the funding agency for its support.

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Correspondence to Kamlesh Singh.

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Singh, K., Ruch, W. & Junnarkar, M. Effect of the Demographic Variables and Psychometric Properties of the Personal Well-Being Index for School Children in India. Child Ind Res 8, 571–585 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12187-014-9264-4

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Keywords

  • Personal well-being
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Flourishing
  • Life satisfaction