Determinants of academic self-efficacy in different socialization contexts: investigating the relationship between students’ academic self-efficacy and its sources in different contexts

Abstract

The present study examined the four sources of self-efficacy (mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal and social persuasion, and physiological state) and how these predict academic self-efficacy over time in N = 1597 (t1) and N = 1373 (t2) 7th-grade students. We simultaneously differentiated three different educationally relevant socialization contexts: the family, peers, and school. Although existing measures to assess sources of academic self-efficacy have considered different socialization contexts, they have done this neither systematically nor for all sources. Confirmatory factor analysis of the four sources in three socialization contexts showed a good fit to the data. Results of structural equation models at t1 showed differential patterns of substantial impact on academic self-efficacy in each socialization context. Over time, the impact decreased when controlling for SES. Results deliver only partial support for Bandura’s theoretical approach and indicate the need to revise social-cognitive theory.

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Funding

This study was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (http://www.bmbf; Grant Numbers 01JC1118A and 01JC1118B). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

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Gebauer, M.M., McElvany, N., Bos, W. et al. Determinants of academic self-efficacy in different socialization contexts: investigating the relationship between students’ academic self-efficacy and its sources in different contexts. Soc Psychol Educ 23, 339–358 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-019-09535-0

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Keywords

  • Social-cognitive theory
  • Socialization contexts
  • Sources of self-efficacy
  • Students’ academic self-efficacy