Social Psychology of Education

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 41–55

The Zero programme against bullying: effects of the programme in the context of the Norwegian manifesto against bullying

  • Erling Roland
  • Edvin Bru
  • Unni Vere Midthassel
  • Grete S. Vaaland
Article

Abstract

The anti-bullying programme ‘Zero’ was implemented at 146 Norwegian primary schools. The outcome among pupils was evaluated after 12 months of the total 16-month period using an age-equivalent design. The present study shows that bullying was reduced among pupils in the schools participating in the Zero programme. Moreover, National surveys in spring 2001 and spring 2004 showed a reduction in pupils being victimised in Norway over 3 years. The high profiled national Manifesto Against Bullying started officially in September 2002 and the first period lasted 2 years. The majority of the schools comprising the 2004 national sample reported a substantial increase in anti-bullying work compared to the three-year period before 2001. Interactions between national concern and programme effect are discussed.

Keywords

Bullying Intervention Zero programme Manifesto 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erling Roland
    • 1
  • Edvin Bru
    • 1
  • Unni Vere Midthassel
    • 1
  • Grete S. Vaaland
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Behavioural ResearchUniversity of StavangerStavangerNorway

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