Refractories and Industrial Ceramics

, Volume 58, Issue 3, pp 259–268 | Cite as

Secondary Mineral Resources for Refractory Manufacture. Part 1. Silica Technogenic Materials

  • V. A. Perepelitsyn
  • F. L. Kapustin
  • A. A. Ponomarenko
  • K. G. Zemlyanoi
  • Z. G. Ponomarenko
  • L. P. Yakovleva
  • L. A. Rechneva
  • A. Yu. Kolobov
RAW MATERIALS
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Aversion is proposed for chemical and mineral classification of technogenic refractory raw material. Secondary mineral resources are considered of essentially silica composition represented by four large-scale technogenic formations.Waste-free technology is developed for processing sub-standard material with preparation of enriched raw material for producing quartzite filler grade ZVK-97, building gravel, and sand. The suitability is established for the fine-grained fraction of silica waste (enrichment tailings) for preparing molding, filter, building materials, and also in a raw material for producing some grades of packaging glass and other materials. The possibility is demonstrated of using regeneration products of exhausted molding mixes for preparing high quality dinas. Microsilica is studied comprehensively, on whose basis promising areas for its utilization are developed.

Keywords

silica sub-standard quartzite enrichment tailings molding sand microsilica technogenic raw material secondary mineral resources 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Perepelitsyn
    • 1
  • F. L. Kapustin
    • 1
  • A. A. Ponomarenko
    • 1
  • K. G. Zemlyanoi
    • 1
  • Z. G. Ponomarenko
    • 2
  • L. P. Yakovleva
    • 2
  • L. A. Rechneva
    • 2
  • A. Yu. Kolobov
    • 2
  1. 1.FGAOU VO Ural Federal UniversityEkaterinburgRussia
  2. 2.OAO DinurPervoural’skRussia

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