Qualitative Sociology

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 257–274 | Cite as

Life After (Straightedge) Subculture

Article

Abstract

This paper uses 20 in-depth interviews with individuals who formerly identified as straightedge to explore a largely overlooked but potentially important dimension of youth subcultures: life after subculture. Interviews illustrate the potential importance of life after subculture for gaining a fuller understanding of subculture and indicate that residue from former subcultural affiliation can be a marker of a group’s relative substance. Interviews additionally underscore problems with prevailing theoretical models of subculture and support the claim that approaches to and conceptions of subculture should attend to phenomenological levels of analysis and potentialities.

Keywords

Subculture Straightedge Youth identity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyRutgers University—New BrunswickPiscatawayUSA

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