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Room temperature biogenic synthesis of multiple nanoparticles (Ag, Pd, Fe, Rh, Ni, Ru, Pt, Co, and Li) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SM1

Abstract

Room temperature biosynthesis of Ag, Pd, Fe, Rh, Ni, Ru, Pt, Co, and Li nanoparticles was achieved using Pseudomonas aeruginosa SM1 without the addition of growth media, electron donors, stabilizing agents, preparation of cell/cell-free extract or temperature, and pH adjustments. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was observed that P. aeruginosa SM1 is capable of producing both intracellular (Co and Li) and extracellular (Ag, Pd, Fe, Rh, Ni, Ru, and Pt) nanoparticles in both crystalline and amorphous state. The FT-IR spectra clearly showed the presence of primary and secondary amines which may be responsible for the reduction and subsequent stabilization of the resulting extracellular nanoparticles which were obtained as a one-step process. This suggests toward an unknown “selection mechanism” that reduces certain metal ions and allows others to enter the cell membrane. Finally, in this first of its kind study, single strain of bacteria was used to produce several different mono-metallic nanoparticles.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation for its financial support through the Grant BIO2008-02841.

Our gratitude also goes to Dr. Francesc Gispert Guirado of the Scientific and Technical Resources Service of the URV (Tarragona) for his help with the X-ray diffraction analyses.

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Correspondence to Magda Constanti.

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Srivastava, S.K., Constanti, M. Room temperature biogenic synthesis of multiple nanoparticles (Ag, Pd, Fe, Rh, Ni, Ru, Pt, Co, and Li) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SM1. J Nanopart Res 14, 831 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11051-012-0831-7

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Keywords

  • Nanoparticles
  • Biosynthesis
  • Nanotechnology
  • Green chemistry
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa