Journal of Community Health

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 392–397 | Cite as

Awareness and Prevention of Osteoporosis Among South Asian Women

  • Amer Shakil
  • Nora E. Gimpel
  • Hina Rizvi
  • Zafreen Siddiqui
  • Emeka Ohagi
  • Tiffany M. Billmeier
  • Barbara Foster
Original Paper

Abstract

We examined awareness of osteoporosis prevention among peri- and post-menopausal South Asian women attending two community centers in the Dallas/Fort-Worth Metroplex. We conducted a quasi-experimental study (final N = 61) assessing knowledge about osteoporosis among South Asian women (≥40 years). The mean age was 52.3 years (SD = 8.72). Over 50% were college educated and 64% had no health insurance. We administered a baseline knowledge test, followed by a health education intervention and, 2 weeks later, by a post-test. Participants received one point for each correct answer and scores were added (≤14). Participants showed a significant increase in osteoporosis knowledge post intervention (paired t60 = −9.5, P < .01). For example, women reported highest knowledge gains on the following: adequate calcium intake is achievable from two glasses of milk a day; very thin women are at risk for developing osteoporosis, and family history of osteoporosis is a risk factor. Intervention completers were better prepared to prevent and manage osteoporosis. Results indicate the efficacy of educational intervention in improving osteoporosis awareness; and point to the potential for knowledge acquisition aimed at developing community-based prevention strategies at the community level.

Keywords

Osteoporosis South Asian Health education intervention Pre-menopausal Post-menopausal 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amer Shakil
    • 1
  • Nora E. Gimpel
    • 2
  • Hina Rizvi
    • 1
  • Zafreen Siddiqui
    • 1
  • Emeka Ohagi
    • 2
  • Tiffany M. Billmeier
    • 2
  • Barbara Foster
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Community MedicineUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDallasUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family and Community MedicineDivision of Community MedicineDallasUSA

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