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Cell/surface interactions and adhesion on bioactive glass 45S5

  • S. Levy
  • M. Van Dalen
  • S. Agonafer
  • W. O. SoboyejoEmail author
Article

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of surface texture (smooth versus rough) on cell/surface interactions on the bioactive glass, 45S5. The cell surface interactions associated with cell spreading are studied using cell culture experiments. Subsequent energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is also used to reveal the distributions of calcium, phosphorous, sodium and oxygen on the surfaces of the bioactive glasses. The implications of the results are then discussed for the applications of textured bioactive glasses in medicine.

Keywords

Bioactive Glass Cell Spreading Scan Electron Micro Bioactive Material MC3T3 Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Levy
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Van Dalen
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Agonafer
    • 1
    • 3
  • W. O. Soboyejo
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of MaterialsPrinceton
  2. 2.The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringPrinceton UniversityPrinceton
  3. 3.The Department of Chemical EngineeringPrinceton UniversityPrinceton

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