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Health Care Analysis

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 401–417 | Cite as

Interdependence, Human Rights and Global Health Law

  • A. M. ViensEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The connection between health and human rights continues to play a prominent role within global health law. In particular, a number of theorists rely on the claim that there is a relation of interdependence between health and human rights. The nature and extent of this relation, however, is rarely defined, developed or defended in a conceptually robust way. This paper seeks to explore the source, scope and strength of this putative relation and what role it might play in developing a global health law framework.

Keywords

Health Human rights Global health Law Public health Gostin 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Angus Dawson, who first got me to start thinking more about human rights in the context of public and global health when he invited me to speak at a joint meeting of the International Association of Bioethics’ Public Health Ethics Network (InterPHEN) and the Philosophy and Bioethics Network in Singapore in 2010 that provided the basis for this paper. I would also like to thank Claire Lougarre for helpful comments on an earlier draft of the manuscript, and John Coggon for inviting me to participate in the special issue.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Public Health Ethics and Law Research Group, Centre for Health, Ethics and Law, Southampton Law SchoolUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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