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How Parents Feel About Their Child’s Teacher/School: Implications for Early Childhood Professionals

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to describe the effects that parent perceptions of their relationships with teachers have on parent involvement. After providing a brief review of literature identifying the importance of parent–teacher relationship formation, the authors provide suggestions for early childhood educators that will help them establish and maintain productive relationships with the families that they serve.

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Correspondence to Herman T. Knopf.

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Knopf, H.T., Swick, K.J. How Parents Feel About Their Child’s Teacher/School: Implications for Early Childhood Professionals. Early Childhood Educ J 34, 291–296 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-006-0119-6

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Keywords

  • parent–teacher relationships
  • parent involvement
  • family involvement