AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Issue 7, pp 2510–2520 | Cite as

A Peer-Educator Network HIV Prevention Intervention Among Injection Drug Users: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial in St. Petersburg, Russia

  • Irving F. Hoffman
  • Carl A. Latkin
  • Polina V. Kukhareva
  • Sergey V. Malov
  • Julia V. Batluk
  • Alla V. Shaboltas
  • Roman V. Skochilov
  • Nicolay V. Sokolov
  • Sergei V. Verevochkin
  • Michael G. Hudgens
  • Andrei P. Kozlov
Original Paper

Abstract

We evaluated the efficacy of a peer-educator network intervention as a strategy to reduce HIV acquisition among injection drug users (IDUs) and their drug and/or sexual networks. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in St. Petersburg, Russia among IDU index participants and their risk network participants. Network units were randomized to the control or experimental intervention. Only the experimental index participants received training sessions to communicate risk reduction techniques to their network members. Analysis includes 76 index and 84 network participants who were HIV uninfected. The main outcome measure was HIV sero-conversion. The incidence rates in the control and experimental groups were 19.57 (95 % CI 10.74–35.65) and 7.76 (95 % CI 3.51–17.19) cases per 100 p/y, respectively. The IRR was 0.41 (95 % CI 0.15–1.08) without a statistically significant difference between the two groups (log rank test statistic X2 = 2.73, permutation p value = 0.16). Retention rate was 67 % with a third of the loss due to incarceration or death. The results show a promising trend that this strategy would be successful in reducing the acquisition of HIV among IDUs.

Keywords

Injection drug users Russia HIV prevention Network 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irving F. Hoffman
    • 1
  • Carl A. Latkin
    • 2
  • Polina V. Kukhareva
    • 3
    • 4
  • Sergey V. Malov
    • 5
  • Julia V. Batluk
    • 3
    • 5
  • Alla V. Shaboltas
    • 3
    • 5
  • Roman V. Skochilov
    • 3
    • 5
  • Nicolay V. Sokolov
    • 3
    • 5
  • Sergei V. Verevochkin
    • 3
  • Michael G. Hudgens
    • 4
  • Andrei P. Kozlov
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, UNC HospitalsUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Bloomberg School of Public HealthJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Biomedical CenterSt. PetersburgRussia
  4. 4.Department of Biostatistics, School of Public HealthUniversity of North Carolina (UNC)Chapel HillUSA
  5. 5.St. Petersburg St. UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia

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