Aerobiologia

pp 1–17

Changes in the Mediterranean pine forest: pollination patterns and annual trends of airborne pollen

  • Concepción De Linares
  • Rosario Delgado
  • Maria Jesús Aira
  • Purificación Alcázar
  • Silvia Alonso-Pérez
  • Marzia Boi
  • Paloma Cariñanos
  • Emilio Cuevas
  • Consuelo Díaz de la Guardia
  • Belén Elvira-Rendueles
  • Delia Fernández-González
  • Carmen Galán
  • Adela Montserrat Gutiérrez-Bustillo
  • Rosa Pérez-Badia
  • Francisco Javier Rodríguez-Rajo
  • Luis Ruíz-Valenzuela
  • Rafael Tormo-Molina
  • Maria del Mar Trigo
  • Rosa M. Valencia-Barrera
  • Ana Valle
  • Jordina Belmonte
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10453-017-9476-4

Cite this article as:
De Linares, C., Delgado, R., Aira, M.J. et al. Aerobiologia (2017). doi:10.1007/s10453-017-9476-4

Abstract

In some areas, forests are being affected in diverse aspects such as structure, composition and biodiversity showing an increase or a decrease in the growth rates. Pinus is one of the most dominant genera in the forests of the Northern Hemisphere. This study analyzes the pine pollination patterns in 30 locations of Spain with an average of 21-year dataset. The aim is to evaluate possible changes in flowering intensity as well as in annual pollen production trends, according to the airborne pollen patterns. Annual Pollen Indices show three threshold values: (1) over 4000 grains per year in Catalonia, the Central System Mountains and Ourense (Galicia), (2) between 4000 and 1000 grains in central-south Spain and in the Balearic Islands, and (3) under 1000 in eastern Spain, Cartagena and the Canary Islands. Airborne pollen patterns were also influenced by Pinus species: The species located in the littoral and low land areas pollinated in the first pollination phase, from February to April, and the mountain pine species did in the second one, from April to June. The statistical analyses reveal increasing significant trends in 12 sites and significant decreasing trends in two. The Pinus flowering intensity is showing an earlier start and a delay in the end of the pollination period, thus a longer period of pollen in the air. This study suggests that the aerobiological monitoring is an interesting bio-indicator of changes happening in Pinus landscapes, and therefore explains the vulnerability of this genus in Spain.

Keywords

Pinus pollen Environment and climate change Flowering intensity Annual trends Pollination patterns 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Concepción De Linares
    • 1
    • 2
    • 19
  • Rosario Delgado
    • 3
  • Maria Jesús Aira
    • 4
  • Purificación Alcázar
    • 5
  • Silvia Alonso-Pérez
    • 6
  • Marzia Boi
    • 7
  • Paloma Cariñanos
    • 8
  • Emilio Cuevas
    • 9
  • Consuelo Díaz de la Guardia
    • 8
  • Belén Elvira-Rendueles
    • 10
  • Delia Fernández-González
    • 11
    • 12
  • Carmen Galán
    • 5
  • Adela Montserrat Gutiérrez-Bustillo
    • 13
  • Rosa Pérez-Badia
    • 14
  • Francisco Javier Rodríguez-Rajo
    • 15
  • Luis Ruíz-Valenzuela
    • 16
  • Rafael Tormo-Molina
    • 17
  • Maria del Mar Trigo
    • 18
  • Rosa M. Valencia-Barrera
    • 11
  • Ana Valle
    • 8
  • Jordina Belmonte
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Unitat de BotànicaUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain
  2. 2.Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA)Universitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain
  3. 3.Departament de MatemàtiquesUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain
  4. 4.Department of Botany, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of SantiagoSantiago de CompostelaSpain
  5. 5.Department of Botany, Ecology and Plant PhysiologyCampus de Rabanales, University of CordobaCórdobaSpain
  6. 6.Universidad Europea de CanariasLaureate International UniversitiesLa OrotavaSpain
  7. 7.Department of Biology, Area of BotanyUniversity of the Balearic IslandsPalma de MallorcaSpain
  8. 8.Department of BotanyUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain
  9. 9.Centro de Investigación Atmosférica de IzañaAgencia Estatal de MeteorologíaSanta Cruz de TenerifeSpain
  10. 10.Department of Chemical and Environmental EngineeringPolytechnic University of CartagenaCartagenaSpain
  11. 11.Department of Biodiversity and Environmental Management (Botany)University of LeónLeónSpain
  12. 12.Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (CNR)BolognaItaly
  13. 13.Department of Plant Biology IIUniversidad Complutense de MadridMadridSpain
  14. 14.Institute of Environmental SciencesUniversity of Castilla-La ManchaToledoSpain
  15. 15.Department of Plant Biology and Soil SciencesUniversity of VigoVigoSpain
  16. 16.Department of Animal Biology, Plant Biology and EcologyUniversity of JaénJaénSpain
  17. 17.Department of Plant Biology, Ecology and Earth Sciences, Faculty of ScienceUniversity of ExtremaduraBadajozSpain
  18. 18.Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of MálagaMálagaSpain
  19. 19.Unitat de BotànicaUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain