A survey of outdoor and indoor airborne fungal spora in the Redemption City, Ogun State, south-western Nigeria

Abstract

The concentration and biodiversity of airborne fungi of the Redemption City, an immense campground for Christian faithful and the temporary site of the Redeemer’s University in south-western Nigeria, was studied between February and May 2011 using the culture plate method. The study was undertaken to assess the concentrations of fungal spores and their health implication in this ever-busy environment. Fifteen different sites classified as closed or open were selected. During the experiment, a total of 228 colonies were counted, and 29 fungal species belonging to 26 genera were isolated which include the following: Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Bipolaris spp., Chrysosporium spp., Cladosporium spp., Coniothyrium corda, Curvularia spp., Diplodia spp., Fusarium spp., Gliocladium spp., Monilia spp., Mucor spp., Mucor plumbeus, Penicillium spp., Phycomyces spp., Phytophthora spp., Pilobolus spp., Pyrenochaeta spp., Rhizopus stolonifer, Torula spp., Trichoderma spp. and Trichophyton spp. The most frequently occurring fungi were A. niger, C. corda and M. plumbeus, while the least recorded were Torula and Trichophyton species. Majority of the fungi isolated are known allergens; they could also be opportunistic causing various diseases in man. There is therefore a dire need for good sanitation practices within the studied areas of the camp.

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Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge the management of Redeemer’s University for proving financial assistance and the facilities needed for the successful completion of this project. We are equally indebted to Prof. Adedotun Adekunle of the Botany Department, University of Lagos, for proof reading and correcting the manuscript.

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Correspondence to E. U. Durugbo.

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Durugbo, E.U., Kajero, A.O., Omoregie, E.I. et al. A survey of outdoor and indoor airborne fungal spora in the Redemption City, Ogun State, south-western Nigeria. Aerobiologia 29, 201–216 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10453-012-9274-y

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Keywords

  • Airborne fungi
  • Respiratory allergy
  • Indoor
  • Outdoor
  • Redemption City
  • South-western Nigeria