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Changes in the composition of coelomic fluid in the Atlantic stingray, Hypanus sabina, upon dilution of the environmental salinity: osmoregulatory and pH implications

Abstract

Euryhaline stingrays, Hypanus sabina, adapted to full-strength seawater (FSW) were transferred to diluted (50%) seawater (DSW). Osmolytes in plasma (PL), coelomic fluid (CF) and tank water (TW) were measured. CF volume increased 56.9% in DSW. Osmolyte concentrations (mass/volume). DSW: PL and CF osmolality decreased 18.3% and 14.0%, respectively. PL and CF: Na+, Cl-, K+ were equimolar in FSW, but lower than those in TW. These osmolytes and urea in CF did not significantly decrease in DSW. Absolute amounts (total osmolytes in CF): Na+, Cl-, K+ and urea increased: 29.8, 30.2, 56.2, 68.8 and 54.9%, respectively, in DSW. The acidic pH of CF (5.5–5.8) was significantly lower than that of PL (7.3) or TW (7.7) in both environments. The coelomic epithelium is a selective transport site of solutes and hydrogen/bicarbonate ions and is an osmoregulatory organ through fluid release to the environment via patent abdominal pores. Animals collected 32.60N, 79.83W.

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Acknowledgments

We appreciate Wm. Roumalliat of the Inshore Fisheries Group of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources for providing the stingrays. The animal experiments and protocols described in this study were done at facilities of the Medical University of South Carolina’s (MUSC) Ft. Johnson campus (James Island, SC) and those of the College of Charleston. These facilities were included in MUSC’s AAALAC, International accreditation from the time of their inception as well as MUSC’s assurance to OLAW/NIH. These facilities were inspected and approved by Dr. Michael Swindle who was the Institutional Veterinarian for regulatory issues and was a voting member of the MUSC IACUC. The protocols were approved by the MUSC’s Animal Care and Use Committee as well as those of the College of Charleston (IACUC) and approved according to the National Institutes of Health Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. This study was supported by National Science Foundation grant (IBN 9816747) to E.R.L. All authors contributed equally to the manuscript and have approved the submitted version.

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Correspondence to Eric R. Lacy.

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Lacy, E.R., Nicholas, J.S. & Colglazier, J. Changes in the composition of coelomic fluid in the Atlantic stingray, Hypanus sabina, upon dilution of the environmental salinity: osmoregulatory and pH implications. Ichthyol Res (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10228-022-00880-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10228-022-00880-3

Keywords

  • Stingray
  • Coelom
  • Osmoregulation
  • pH