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Ameliorative effect of IDS 30, a stinging nettle leaf extract, on chronic colitis

Abstract

Background and aims

Anti-TNF-α antibodies are very effective in the treatment of acute Crohn’s disease, but are limited by the decline of their effectiveness after repeated applications. The stinging nettle leaf extract, IDS 30, is an adjuvant remedy in rheumatic diseases dependent on a cytokine suppressive effect. We investigated the effect of IDS 30 on disease activity of murine colitis in different models.

Methods

C3H.IL-10−/− and BALB/c mice with colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) were treated with either IDS 30 or water. Mice were monitored for clinical signs of colitis. Inflammation was scored histologically, and faecal IL-1β and mucosal cytokines were measured by ELISA. Mononuclear cell proliferation of spleen and Peyer’s patches were quantified by 3H-thymidine.

Results

Mice with chronic DSS colitis or IL-10−/− mice treated with IDS 30 clinically and histologically revealed significantly (p<0.05) fewer signs of colitis than untreated animals. Furthermore, faecal IL-1β and mucosal TNF-α concentrations were significantly lower (p<0.05) in treated mice. Mononuclear cell proliferation after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide was significantly (p<0.001) reduced in mice treated with IDS 30.

Conclusions

The long-term use of IDS 30 is effective in the prevention of chronic murine colitis. This effect seems to be due to a decrease in the Th1 response and may be a new therapeutic option for prolonging remission in inflammatory bowel disease.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF 31-59031.99), by a grant to Astrid Konrad from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (KO-2228/2-1) and by Strathmann AG, Hamburg, Germany.

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Correspondence to Frank Seibold.

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Konrad, A., Mähler, M., Arni, S. et al. Ameliorative effect of IDS 30, a stinging nettle leaf extract, on chronic colitis. Int J Colorectal Dis 20, 9–17 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00384-004-0619-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00384-004-0619-z

Keywords

  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • IDS 30
  • Murine colitis
  • TNF-α