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Streptococcus mutans in Umbilical Cord Blood, Peripheral Blood, and Saliva from Healthy Mothers

Abstract

The aims of this study were to analyze the presence of Streptococcus mutans (SM)-DNA in cord blood (CB), maternal peripheral blood (PB), and maternal saliva (SA) and compare with data collected in health surveys. Sixty-four healthy women with pregnancies to term and without complications attending for elective cesarean section in the Clinical Hospital of Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo were included. Samples of PB and unstimulated SA were obtained on the day of hospitalization and samples of CB were collected after the delivery section. Samples were investigated using polymerase chain reaction for the presence of SM-DNA using specific primers. The results show over 50% of the sample of PB and CB showed SM-DNA detectable. There was a positive correlation between the SM detection in PB/CB and SA (P < 0.05). Pregnant women, who reported tooth brushing more than three times a day, often showed detectable SM-DNA in PB and CB (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the majority of children can have contact with SM-DNA during the intrauterine life by the CB. SM probably transferred from salivary habitat to PB and CB. The tooth brushing can be associated to S. mutans detection in blood samples.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported by Fundação de Apoio a Pesquisa de Minas Gerais e Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (2848/2011).

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MMM designed the study, performed the experiments, collected and analyzed data, and wrote the paper. SCB collected data, performed the experiments and revised the manuscript. RDBR participated in the analysis and interpretation of data and revised the manuscript. RBR participated in the analysis and interpretation of data and revised the manuscript. G-MVR designed the study, supervised data collection and analysis, and revised the manuscript. RV designed the study and revised the manuscript. FVPL designed the study and revised the manuscript. NRD designed the study, supervised data collection and laboratorial experiments, participated in the interpretation of data, and revised the paper.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ruchele Dias Nogueira.

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The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Mendes, M.M., da Silva, C.B., Rodrigues, D.B.R. et al. Streptococcus mutans in Umbilical Cord Blood, Peripheral Blood, and Saliva from Healthy Mothers. Curr Microbiol 75, 1372–1377 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00284-018-1532-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00284-018-1532-y