Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 60, Issue 6, pp 794–802

Reduction of the association preference for conspecifics in cave-dwelling Atlantic mollies, Poecilia mexicana

  • Rüdiger Riesch
  • Ingo Schlupp
  • Michael Tobler
  • Martin Plath
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-006-0223-z

Cite this article as:
Riesch, R., Schlupp, I., Tobler, M. et al. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2006) 60: 794. doi:10.1007/s00265-006-0223-z

Abstract

Cave animals are widely recognised as model organisms to study regressive evolutionary processes like the reduction of eyes. In this paper, we report on the regressive evolution of species discrimination in the cave molly, Poecilia mexicana, which, unlike other cave fishes, still has functional eyes. This allowed us to examine the response to both visual and non-visual cues involved in species discrimination. When surface-dwelling females were given a chance to associate with either a conspecific or a swordtail (Xiphophorus hellerii) female, they strongly preferred the conspecific female both when multiple cues and when solely visual cues were available to the female. No association preference was observed when only non-visual cues were provided. In contrast, cave-dwelling females showed no preference under all testing conditions, suggesting that species recognition mechanisms have been reduced. We discuss the role of species discrimination in relation to habitat differences.

Keywords

Cave fish Poeciliidae Xiphophorus Shoaling Species recognition 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rüdiger Riesch
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ingo Schlupp
    • 1
    • 3
  • Michael Tobler
    • 1
    • 3
  • Martin Plath
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA
  2. 2.Biozentrum GrindelUniversität HamburgHamburgGermany
  3. 3.Zoologisches InstitutUniversität ZürichZürichSwitzerland
  4. 4.Unit of Evolutionary Biology and Systematic Zoology, Department of Biochemistry and BiologyUniversity of PotsdamPotsdamGermany

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