The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 97–104 | Cite as

A retrospective appreciation of Willard Day’s contributions to radical behaviorism and the analysis of verbal behavior

  • Jay Moore
Article

Abstract

Willard Day’s contributions to radical behaviorism are grouped under three headings: (a) an emphasis on the distinction between radical and methodological behaviorism; (b) an emphasis on the interpretation, rather than the prediction and control, of behavior; and (c) an emphasis on the analysis of verbal behavior as a natural, ongoing phenomenon. The paper suggests that the contributions above are listed in ascending order of significance.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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