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Inclusion of children with special needs in school-age child care programs

Abstract

From an ecological perspective, the inclusion of children in school-age child care (SACC) requires collaboration among policy makers, educators, parents, and child care providers. Both typically and atypically developing children benefit from inclusive programs, yet they pose challenges for care-givers primarily due to lack of training, resources, and identification of successful inclusive program components. The process of successful SACC inclusion should be at the forefront of human service and research agendas.

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Correspondence to Alice Henderson Hall.

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Hall, A.H., Niemeyer, J.A. Inclusion of children with special needs in school-age child care programs. Early Childhood Educ J 27, 185–190 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02694233

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Key words

  • school-age child care
  • inclusion
  • school-age children with special needs