Advertisement

Medical and biological engineering

, Volume 4, Issue 5, pp 433–438 | Cite as

Is bone hydraulically strengthened?

  • S. A. V. Swanson
  • M. A. R. Freeman
Article

Abstract

The hypothesis that bone, either tubular or trabecular, is hydraulically strengthened is examined. (1) Tubular bone. On the basis of information available in the literature, it is concluded that tubular bone is not hydraulically strengthened. (2) Trabecular bone. On the basis of an experimental study reported in this paper, it is concluded also that trabecular bone is not hydraulically strengthened.

Keywords

Trabecular Bone Grease Load Carriage Tubular Bone Elastic Instability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Sommaire

On étudie l'hypothèse suivant laquelle l'os tubulaire ou bien trabéculaire doit sa résistance à l'hydrodynamique. En se basant sur les renseignements fournis dans la littérature, on conclut que l'os tubulaire ne doit pas sa résistance à l'hydrodynamique. D'après une étude expérimentale décrite dans cet article, on conclut aussi que l'os trabéculaire ne doit pas sa résistance à l'hydrodynamique.

Zusammenfassung

Die Hypothese, daß tubulärer oder trabekulärer Knochen hydraulisch verstärkt wird, wird untersucht. (1) Tubulärer Knochen. Aufgrund von Angaben aus der Literatur wird geschlossen, daß tubulärer Knochen nicht hydraulisch verstärkt wird. (2) Trabekulärer Knochen. Aufgrund von experimentellen Studien im Rahmen dieser Untersuchung wird geschlossen, daß auch trabekulärer Knochen nicht hydraulisch verstärkt wird.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Evans, F. G. (1957)Stress and Strain in Bones. p. 181. C. C. Thomas, Springfield, Illinois.Google Scholar
  2. Frankel, V. H. (1960)The Femoral Neck. Almqvist and Wiksell, Göteborg.Google Scholar
  3. Frost, H. M. (1964)The Laws of Bone Structure. C. C. Thomas, Springfield, Illinois.Google Scholar
  4. Inman, V. T. (1947) Functional aspects of the abductor muscles of the hip.J. Bone Jt Surg.,29, 607–619.Google Scholar
  5. Macpherson, A. andJuhasz, L. (1965) In Biomechanics and Related Bio-Engineering Topics. (Ed.R. M. Kenedi) p. 181. Pergamon Press, London.Google Scholar
  6. McCutchen, C. W. (1965) In Biomechanics and Related Bio-Engineering Topics. (Ed.R. M. Kenedi) p. 244. Pergamon Press, London.Google Scholar
  7. Merrill, E. W., Benis, A. M., Gilliland, E. R., Sherwood, T. K. andSalzman, E. W. (1965) Pressure-flow relations of human blood in hollow fibres at low flow rates,J. appl. Physiol.,20, 954.Google Scholar
  8. Stein, A. M., Morgan, H. C. andPorras, R. F. (1958) The effect of pressor and depressor drugs on intramedullary bone-marrow pressure.J. Bone Jt Surg.,40, 1103.Google Scholar
  9. Trueta, J. (1965) Personal Communication.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. A. V. Swanson
    • 1
  • M. A. R. Freeman
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical Engineering DepartmentImperial CollegeLondon

Personalised recommendations