Child's Nervous System

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 100–102 | Cite as

Safety and effectiveness of an acellular pertussis vaccine in subjects with Down's syndrome

  • S. Li Volti
  • T. Mattina
  • L. Mauro
  • S. Bianca
  • S. Anfuso
  • A. Ursino
  • F. Mollica
Original Paper

Abstract

We evaluated the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of an acellular pertussis vaccine in 24 subjects affected by Down's syndrome and in 10 normal infants. Neither general nor local adverse reactions were observed in either group of subjects. The new acellular vaccine administration elicited protective levels of antibodies in all the subjects with Down's syndrome, although the geometric mean titres of IgG antibodies againstBordetella pertussis in these subjects were significantly lower than in normal controls.

Key words

Acellular pertussis vaccine Down's syndrome Immunization 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Li Volti
    • 1
  • T. Mattina
    • 1
  • L. Mauro
    • 2
  • S. Bianca
    • 1
  • S. Anfuso
    • 1
  • A. Ursino
    • 2
  • F. Mollica
    • 1
  1. 1.Pediatric ClinicUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly
  2. 2.Institute of Hygiene and Preventive MedicineUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly

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