Possibilities of utilizing cold working caused by hydrogen in practice

  • V. N. Polyakov
  • V. N. Geminov
  • V. M. Kushnarenko
  • L. V. Suraikina
Article
  • 26 Downloads

Conclusions

It is shown that the hydrogen cold working effects and hydrogen plastification can take place in testing materials in hydrogen- and hydrogen sulfide-bearing media. However, these effects are unstable with time and are detected under specific conditions. They were detected if the surface of the tested specimen was smooth, without notches, cracks, large scratches, and the surface roughness was minimum.

These effects were not detected in the steel specimens with the coatings. In the aqueous solutions of H2S and H2S+ HCl hydrogen cold working was detected whereas in halide-bearing media it was not found.

The effects were detected in limited ranges of the mechanical loading rate. They cannot by utilized to increase the stress corrosion cracking resistance. The Soviet literature contains reports [15, 23, 24] according to which these phenomena in various processing treatments.

Keywords

Hydrogen Aqueous Solution Surface Roughness Cold Working Processing Treatment 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. N. Polyakov
    • 1
  • V. N. Geminov
    • 1
  • V. M. Kushnarenko
    • 1
  • L. V. Suraikina
    • 1
  1. 1.A. A. Baikov Institute of MetallurgyOrenburg Polytechnical InstituteMoscow

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