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Human chromosomal polymorphism. III. Chromosomal Q polymorphism in Mongoloids of northern Asia

Summary

Q-heterochromatin variants in seven autosomes (3, 4, 13–15, 21, 22) were studied in two Mongoloid populations of northern Asia (Chukchi and Khakass). Q-staining was obtained using propylquinacrine mustard. Of 132 Chukchi individuals aged 13 to 20 years, 124 had Q-polymorphic chromosomes, while eight (6.0%) had no bands with fluorescence levels 4 and 5. The mean number of Q variants was 2.2 per individual.

Of the 120 Khakass individuals aged 14 to 17 years, 112 had Q-polymorphic chromosomes, while eight (6.7%) had no Q variants with fluorescence levels 4 and 5. The mean number of Q variants was 2.5 per individual. No differences were found in the frequency of Q variants between sexes in the two populations. There was complete agreement between the observed homo-and heteromorphic frequencies and those predicted by the law of Hardy-Weinberg. As the Mongoloid populations of northern Asia showed statistically significant homogeneity both in the frequency of Q variants and the distribution of homo-and heteromorphic variants, they were examined as a single group—that of northern Mongoloids. The following questions are discussed: (1) the possible selective value of chromosomal Q-heterochromatin material in the adaptation of human populations to certain extreme environmental factors, in particular to cold and hypoxia; (2) the intraracial heterogeneity of Asian Mongoloids; (3) the taxonomic value of chromosomal Q polymorphism in ethnic anthropology.

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Ibraimov, A.I., Mirrakhimov, M.M. Human chromosomal polymorphism. III. Chromosomal Q polymorphism in Mongoloids of northern Asia. Hum Genet 62, 252–257 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00333531

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00333531

Keywords

  • Internal Medicine
  • Environmental Factor
  • Metabolic Disease
  • Human Population
  • Single Group