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Obesity Surgery

, Volume 26, Issue 8, pp 1836–1842 | Cite as

Trends in Bariatric Surgery in Spain in the Twenty-First Century: Baseline Results and 1-Month Follow Up of the RICIBA, a National Registry

  • Albert LecubeEmail author
  • Ana de Hollanda
  • Alfonso Calañas
  • Núria Vilarrasa
  • Miguel Angel Rubio
  • Irene Breton
  • Albert Goday
  • Josep Vidal
  • Paloma Iglesias
  • María Luisa Fernández-Soto
  • Silvia Pellitero
  • Ana Isabel de Cos
  • María José Morales
  • Cristina Campos
  • Lluís Masmiquel
  • Francisco Tinahones
  • Pedro Pujante
  • Pedro P. García-Luna
  • Marta Bueno
  • Rosa Cámara
  • Orosia Bandrés
  • Assumpta Caixàs
Original Contributions

Abstract

Background

Specific data is needed to safely expand bariatric surgery and to preserve good surgical outcomes in response to the non-stop increase in obesity prevalence worldwide.

Objective

The aims of this study are to provide an overview of the baseline characteristics, type of surgery, and 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Spanish public hospitals, and evaluate changes throughout the 2000–2014 period.

Material and Methods

This is a descriptive study using data from the RICIBA, a computerized multicenter and multidisciplinary registry created by the Obesity Group of the Endocrinology and Nutrition Spanish Society. Three periods according to the date of surgery were created: January 2000 to December 2004 (G1), January 2005 to December 2009 (G2), and January 2010 to December 2014 (G3).

Results

Data from 3843 patients were available (44.8 ± 10.5 years, a 3:1 female-to-male ratio, 46.9 ± 8.2 kg/m2). Throughout the 15-year period assessed, candidate patients for bariatric surgery were progressively older and less obese, with an increase in associated comorbidities and in the prevalence of men. The global trend also showed a progressive decrease in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the most performed bariatric procedure (75.1 % in G1, 69.3 % in G2, and 42.6 % in G3; p < 0.001), associated with a parallel increase in sleeve gastrectomy (0.8 % in G1, 18.1 % in G2, and 39.6 % in G3; p < 0.001). An overall mortality rate of 0.3 % was reported.

Conclusions

Data from Spain is similar to data observed worldwide. Information recorded in the National Registries like RICIBA is necessary in order to safely expand bariatric surgery in response to increasing demand.

Keywords

Registry Bariatric surgery Obesity Trends Spain Procedures 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Cicle Serveis Informàtics developed the website of RICIBA. The RICIBA is a property of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition (SEEN).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Grant Support

Nestlé España, S.A. is the sole sponsor and provides unrestricted technical support to RICIBA.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Lecube
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ana de Hollanda
    • 1
  • Alfonso Calañas
    • 3
  • Núria Vilarrasa
    • 4
  • Miguel Angel Rubio
    • 5
  • Irene Breton
    • 6
  • Albert Goday
    • 7
  • Josep Vidal
    • 8
  • Paloma Iglesias
    • 9
  • María Luisa Fernández-Soto
    • 10
  • Silvia Pellitero
    • 11
  • Ana Isabel de Cos
    • 12
  • María José Morales
    • 13
  • Cristina Campos
    • 14
  • Lluís Masmiquel
    • 15
  • Francisco Tinahones
    • 16
  • Pedro Pujante
    • 17
  • Pedro P. García-Luna
    • 18
  • Marta Bueno
    • 1
  • Rosa Cámara
    • 19
  • Orosia Bandrés
    • 20
  • Assumpta Caixàs
    • 21
  1. 1.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova, CIBERDEM (CIBER de diabetes y enfermedades metabólicas asociadas), ISCIIIInstitut de Recerca Biomèdica de Lleida (IRB-Lleida), Universitat de LleidaLleidaSpain
  2. 2.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitari Vall d’HebrónBarcelonaSpain
  3. 3.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitario Reina SofiaCórdobaSpain
  4. 4.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitari de BellvitgeCIBERDEM (CIBER de diabetes y enfermedades metabólicas asociadas, ISCIII)L’Hospitalet de LlobregatSpain
  5. 5.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Clínico San Carlos IDISSCMadridSpain
  6. 6.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio MarañónMadridSpain
  7. 7.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital del Mar, Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM)CIBEROBN (CIBER de obesidad y nutrición, ISCIII), Departament de Medicina Universitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  8. 8.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, CIBERDEM (CIBER de diabetes y enfermedades metabólicas asociadas, ISCIII)Institut Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS)BarcelonaSpain
  9. 9.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitario Rey Juan CarlosMadridSpain
  10. 10.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitario San CecilioGranadaSpain
  11. 11.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitario Germans Trias i PujolCIBERDEM (CIBER de diabetes y enfermedades metabólicas asociadas), ISCIIIBadalonaSpain
  12. 12.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitario La PazMadridSpain
  13. 13.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de VigoVigoSpain
  14. 14.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitario Virgen MacarenaSevilleSpain
  15. 15.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital de Son LlàtzerPalma de MallorcaSpain
  16. 16.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Complejo Hospitalario de Málaga (Virgen de la Victoria)Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA), Universidad de Málaga, CIBEROBN (CIBER de obesidad y nutrición, ISCIII)MálagaSpain
  17. 17.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la ArrixacaMurciaSpain
  18. 18.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitario Virgen del RocíoSevilleSpain
  19. 19.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La FeValenciaSpain
  20. 20.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Royo VillanovaZaragozaSpain
  21. 21.Obesity Unit and Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments, Hospital Universitari Parc TaulíSabadellSpain

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