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Early Childhood Education Journal

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 245–251 | Cite as

Preschool Science Environment: What Is Available in a Preschool Classroom?

  • Tsunghui Tu
Article

Abstract

This study investigated preschool science environments in 20 preschool classrooms (N=20) in 13 midwestern child care centers. By operationalizing Neuman’s concept of “sciencing,” this study used The Preschool Classroom Science Materials/Equipment Checklist, the Preschool Classroom Science Activities Checklist, and the Preschool Teacher Classroom/Sciencing Form to analyze the availability of science materials, equipment, and activities for preschoolers in the classroom. Each teacher was videotaped for two consecutive days during free play time. The study showed that half of the preschool classrooms had a science area. The activities that the preschool teachers engaged were mostly unrelated to science activities (86.8%), 4.5% of the activities were related to formal sciencing, and 8.8% of the activities were related to informal sciencing.

Keywords

preschool children preschool teachers preschool science science activities science environment science equipment science materials 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Teaching, Leadership and Curriculum StudiesKent State UniversitySalemUSA
  2. 2.Teaching, Leadership and Curriculum StudiesKent State UniversitySalemUSA

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