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, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 35–44 | Cite as

Positive and negative norm regulation and their relationship to therapy group size

  • Gary R. Bond
Article

Abstract

Norm regulation was examined in 18 outpatient psychotherapy groups, each led by cotherapists and varying in size from two to eight clients. Clients indicated acceptabilityand likelihood of occurrenceof 24 member behaviors. Positive norm regulation of acceptable behaviors was more readily achieved than negative norm regulation of unacceptable behaviors. The amount of positive regulation in any group was unrelated to the amount of negative regulation. However, group size was associated with both positive and negative regulation, with very small groups achieving more norm regulations than large groups.

Keywords

Small Group Group Size Negative Regulation Therapy Group Positive Regulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary R. Bond
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyPurdue University School of Science, I.U.P.U.I.Indianapolis

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