Possible Implications of Feminist Theories for the Study of Evolution

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Abstract

The past twenty-five years have witnessed unprecedented growth and fundamental theoretical changes in both feminism and the study of evolutionary biology. Fueled by the second wave of the feminist movement, the first academic women’s studies program was founded in 1970 at San Diego State University (National Women’s Studies Association, 1990). Since that time, over 621 similar programs (NWSA, 1990) have been established at colleges and universities throughout the United States, resulting in what the Chronicle of Higher Education described as one of the most influential phenomena in twentieth-century higher education (McMillen, 1987). Feminist scholars have elaborated a variety of theories useful for explaining data within specific disciplines and within the interdisciplinary field of women’s studies.