Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 433–455

The Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Cognitive Processes and Affect in Patients with Past Depression

Authors

  • Wiveka Ramel1
    • Department of PsychologySan Diego State University
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California San Diego
    • Department of Veterans AffairsSan Diego Healthcare System
  • Philippe R. Goldin
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California San Diego
    • Department of Veterans AffairsSan Diego Healthcare System
  • Paula E. Carmona
    • Department of Veterans AffairsSan Diego Healthcare System
  • John R. McQuaid
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California San Diego
    • Department of Veterans AffairsSan Diego Healthcare System
Article

DOI: 10.1023/B:COTR.0000045557.15923.96

Cite this article as:
Ramel1, W., Goldin, P.R., Carmona, P.E. et al. Cognitive Therapy and Research (2004) 28: 433. doi:10.1023/B:COTR.0000045557.15923.96

Abstract

This study describes the effects of an 8-week course in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR; J. Kabat-Zinn, 1982, 1990) on affective symptoms (depression and anxiety), dysfunctional attitudes, and rumination. Given the focus of mindfulness meditation (MM) in modifying cognitive processes, it was hypothesized that the primary change in MM practice involves reductions in ruminative tendencies. We studied a sample of individuals with lifetime mood disorders who were assessed prior to and upon completion of an MBSR course. We also compared a waitlist sample matched with a subset of the MBSR completers. Overall, the results suggest that MM practice primarily leads to decreases in ruminative thinking, even after controlling for reductions in affective symptoms and dysfunctional beliefs.

meditationcognitive processesruminationaffective disorderstreatment outcomes

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004