International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction

, Volume 12, Issue 6, pp 806–823

Meditation Awareness Training (MAT) for Work-related Wellbeing and Job Performance: A Randomised Controlled Trial

  • Edo Shonin
  • William Van Gordon
  • Thomas J. Dunn
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Mark D. Griffiths
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11469-014-9513-2

Cite this article as:
Shonin, E., Van Gordon, W., Dunn, T.J. et al. Int J Ment Health Addiction (2014) 12: 806. doi:10.1007/s11469-014-9513-2

Abstract

Due to its potential to concurrently improve work-related wellbeing (WRW) and job performance, occupational stakeholders are becoming increasingly interested in the applications of meditation. The present study conducted the first randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of meditation on outcomes relating to both WRW and job performance. Office-based middle-hierarchy managers (n = 152) received an eight-week meditation intervention (Meditation Awareness Training; MAT) or an active control intervention. MAT participants demonstrated significant and sustainable improvements (with strong effect sizes) over control-group participants in levels of work-related stress, job satisfaction, psychological distress, and employer-rated job performance. There are a number of novel implications: (i) meditation can effectuate a perceptual shift in how employees experience their work and psychological environment and may thus constitute a cost-effective WRW intervention, (ii) meditation-based (i.e., present-moment-focussed) working styles may be more effective than goal-based (i.e., future-orientated) working styles, and (iii) meditation may reduce the separation made by employees between their own interests and those of the organizations they work for.

Keywords

Work-related stress Meditation Job Satisfaction Job Performance Meditation Awareness Training Mindfulness Buddhism 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edo Shonin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • William Van Gordon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Thomas J. Dunn
    • 1
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 3
  • Mark D. Griffiths
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DivisionNottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamshireUK
  2. 2.Awake to Wisdom, Centre for Meditation, Mindfulness, and Psychological WellbeingNottinghamUK
  3. 3.Medical College of GeorgiaGeorgia Regents UniversityAugustaUSA
  4. 4.Division of Psychology, Chaucer BuildingNottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK

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