, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 407-408
Date: 03 Sep 2009

David Shambaugh and Michael Yahuda, eds., International Relations of Asia

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Over the last several years, interest in Asian international relations has surged. Yet, at the same time, Asia’s complex history, its geographic reach, plethora of bilateral relations, emerging multilateral institutions, lasting American military presence, and China’s rapid “rise” have continued to make the task of teaching non-specialists about the region a daunting task. Moreover, the recent wave of literature on Asian security and foreign relations has done little to alleviate this difficulty. Simply stated, most of this work has been weighed down with an over-reliance on academic jargon and a disproportionate amount of attention to divisive policy debates. As a result, it has been of limited utility for those (whether in the classroom or the halls of power) in need of a balanced overview of the region. David Shambaugh and Michael Yahuda’s International Relations of Asia goes a long way toward rectifying this situation.

The volume begins with Shambaugh’s introductory chapter which ar