Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 479–489

The dynamic water vapour sorption behaviour of natural fibres and kinetic analysis using the parallel exponential kinetics model

  • Yanjun Xie
  • Callum A. S. Hill
  • Zaihan Jalaludin
  • Simon F. Curling
  • Rajesh D. Anandjiwala
  • Andrew J. Norton
  • Gary Newman
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10853-010-4935-0

Cite this article as:
Xie, Y., Hill, C.A.S., Jalaludin, Z. et al. J Mater Sci (2011) 46: 479. doi:10.1007/s10853-010-4935-0

Abstract

Hygroscopic behaviour is an inherent characteristic of natural fibres which can influence their applications as textile fabrics and composite reinforcements. In this study, the water vapour sorption kinetic properties of cotton, filter paper, flax, hemp, jute, and sisal fibres were determined using a dynamic vapour sorption apparatus and the results were analyzed by use of a parallel exponential kinetics (PEK) model. With all of the fibres tested, the magnitude of the sorption hysteresis observed varied, but it was always greatest at the higher end of the hygroscopic range. Flax and sisal fibres displayed the lowest and highest total hysteresis, respectively. The PEK model, which is comprised of fast and slow sorption components, exhibited hysteresis in terms of mass for both processes between the adsorption and desorption isotherm. The hysteresis derived from the slow sorption process was less than from the fast process for all tested fibres. The fast processes for cotton and filter paper dominated the isotherm process; however, the hemp and sisal fibres displayed a dominant slow process in the isotherm run. The characteristic time for the fast sorption process did not vary between adsorption and desorption, except at the top end of the hygroscopic range. The characteristic time for the slow process was invariably larger for the desorption process. The physical interpretation of the PEK model is discussed.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yanjun Xie
    • 1
  • Callum A. S. Hill
    • 2
    • 3
  • Zaihan Jalaludin
    • 2
  • Simon F. Curling
    • 4
  • Rajesh D. Anandjiwala
    • 5
    • 6
  • Andrew J. Norton
    • 7
  • Gary Newman
    • 8
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology, Ministry of EducationNortheast Forestry UniversityHarbinPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Forest Products Research Institute, Joint Research Institute for Civil and Environmental EngineeringEdinburgh Napier UniversityEdinburghUK
  3. 3.JCH Industrial Ecology LtdAngleseyUK
  4. 4.The BioComposites CentreBangor UniversityBangorUK
  5. 5.CSIR Materials Science and Manufacturing, Nonwovens and Composites Group, Polymers and Composites Competence AreaPort ElizabethSouth Africa
  6. 6.Faculty of Science, Department of Textile ScienceNelson Mandela Metropolitan UniversityPort ElizabethSouth Africa
  7. 7.RenuablesLlanllechidUK
  8. 8.Plant Fibre Technology LtdBangorUK