Oecologia

, Volume 183, Issue 4, pp 1183–1195

Evidence that higher [CO2] increases tree growth sensitivity to temperature: a comparison of modern and paleo oaks

  • Steven L. Voelker
  • Michael C. Stambaugh
  • J. Renée Brooks
  • Frederick C. Meinzer
  • Barbara Lachenbruch
  • Richard P. Guyette
Global change ecology – original research

DOI: 10.1007/s00442-017-3831-6

Cite this article as:
Voelker, S.L., Stambaugh, M.C., Renée Brooks, J. et al. Oecologia (2017) 183: 1183. doi:10.1007/s00442-017-3831-6

Abstract

To test tree growth sensitivity to temperature under different ambient CO2 concentrations, we determined stem radial growth rates as they relate to variation in temperature during the last deglacial period, and compare these to modern tree growth rates as they relate to spatial variation in temperature across the modern species distributional range. Paleo oaks were sampled from Northern Missouri, USA and compared to a pollen-based, high-resolution paleo temperature reconstruction from Northern Illinois, USA. Growth data were from 53 paleo bur oak log cross sections collected in Missouri. These oaks were preserved in river and stream sediments and were radiocarbon-dated to a period of rapid climate change during the last deglaciation (10.5 and 13.3 cal kyr BP). Growth data from modern bur oaks were obtained from increment core collections paired with USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data collected across the Great Plains, Midwest, and Upper Great Lakes regions. For modern oaks growing at an average [CO2] of 330 ppm, growth sensitivity to temperature (i.e., the slope of growth rate versus temperature) was about twice that of paleo oaks growing at an average [CO2] of 230 ppm. These data help to confirm that leaf-level predictions that photosynthesis and thus growth will be more sensitive to temperature at higher [CO2] in mature trees—suggesting that tree growth forest productivity will be increasingly sensitive to temperature under projected global warming and high-[CO2] conditions.

Keywords

Carbon dioxide NPP GPP Photosynthesis Forest productivity 

Supplementary material

442_2017_3831_MOESM1_ESM.docx (311 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 310 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven L. Voelker
    • 1
  • Michael C. Stambaugh
    • 2
  • J. Renée Brooks
    • 3
  • Frederick C. Meinzer
    • 4
  • Barbara Lachenbruch
    • 5
  • Richard P. Guyette
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plants, Soils and ClimateUtah State UniversityLoganUSA
  2. 2.Department of ForestryUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Western Ecology DivisionU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyCorvallisUSA
  4. 4.Pacific Northwest Research StationU.S.D.A. Forest ServiceCorvallisUSA
  5. 5.Department of Forest Ecosystems, SocietyOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

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