, Volume 24, Issue 5, pp 1068-1077

Role of C-reactive protein, D-dimer, and fibrinogen levels in the differential diagnosis of central and peripheral vertigo

Abstract

Vertigo is encountered frequently in emergency services. Researchers have explored the role of serologic markers in the differentiation of central and peripheral vertigo. The study reported here was designed to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of serologic markers (fibrinogen, D-dimer, and C-reactive protein [CRP]) in the differential diagnosis of peripheral and central vertigo. A total of 116 patients who sought treatment for vertigo at Cazi University Hospital Adult Emergency Services during a 3-mo period were included in the study. CRP, fibrinogen, and D-dimer levels were assessed in an effort to differentiate between cases of peripheral and central vertigo. In all, 65.5% of patients (76 patients) were women. Patients younger than 50 y of age accounted for 60.3% (70 patients). The average D-dimer level for the entire group of patients was 1 81.9±132.2 μg/mL, the average CRP level, 4.2±8.4 mg/L, and the average fibrinogen level, 421.9±176.0 mg/dL. Although serum D-dimer, fibrinogen, and CRP values appeared to be higher in patients with central vertigo than in those with peripheral vertigo, no statistically significant differences were noted between the 2 groups in terms of these 3 parameters (P>.05). When 6 mg/L was used as the cutoff point for CRP and 320 mg/dL was used for fibrinogen, the numbers of patients with CRP and fibrinogen levels higher than these values were significantly higher for central vertigo than for peripheral vertigo (P<.05). The present study shows that blood D-dimer, fibrinogen, and CRP levels cannot be significant markers for the differentiation of central and peripheral vertigo.