Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 21–36

Anxiety disorders, depression, and attributional style: A further test of the specificity of depressive attributions

  • Richard G. Heimberg
  • Janet S. Klosko
  • Cynthia S. Dodge
  • Richard Shadick
  • Robert E. Becker
  • David H. Barlow
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01178487

Cite this article as:
Heimberg, R.G., Klosko, J.S., Dodge, C.S. et al. Cogn Ther Res (1989) 13: 21. doi:10.1007/BF01178487

Abstract

This study examined the specificity to depression of the attributional style hypothesized by the reformulated model of learned helplessness. Scores on a modified version of the Attributional Style Questionnaire of patients with dysthymic disorder were compared with those of anxiety disorder patients (social phobic, agoraphobic, and panic disorder) and normal subjects. While dysthymic patients demonstrated more internal, global, and stable attributions for negative events than normals, they did not systematically differ from social phobic or agoraphobic subjects. All groups differed from all the other groups on the Beck Depression Inventory. Analysis of covariance that controlled for depression scores suggested that depression contributed substantially to attributional style, but anxiety disorder diagnosis also exerted a significant effect on some attributional measures. These findings are discussed in terms of their meaning for the reformulated model of learned helplessness and the role of attributional processes in anxiety disorders.

Key words

depressionanxiety disorderattributional style

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard G. Heimberg
    • 1
  • Janet S. Klosko
    • 1
  • Cynthia S. Dodge
    • 1
  • Richard Shadick
    • 1
  • Robert E. Becker
    • 2
  • David H. Barlow
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, Department of PsychologyState University of New York at AlbanyAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Medical College of Pennsylvania at EPPIUSA