Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 181–188

Non-Occupational Sitting and Mental Well-Being in Employed Adults

  • Andrew J. Atkin
  • Emma Adams
  • Fiona C. Bull
  • Stuart J. H. Biddle
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-011-9320-y

Cite this article as:
Atkin, A.J., Adams, E., Bull, F.C. et al. ann. behav. med. (2012) 43: 181. doi:10.1007/s12160-011-9320-y

Abstract

Background

Emerging evidence suggests that sedentary behaviour may be adversely associated with physical health, but few studies have examined the association with mental well-being.

Purpose

This study examined the association of four non-occupational sedentary behaviours, individually and in total, with mental well-being in employed adults.

Methods

Baseline data from the evaluation of Well@Work, a national workplace health promotion project conducted in the UK, were used. Participants self-reported sitting time whilst watching television, using a computer, socialising and travelling by motorised transport. Mental well-being was assessed by the 12-item version of the general health questionnaire. Analyses were conducted using multiple linear regression.

Results

In models adjusted for multiple confounders, TV viewing, computer use and total non-occupational sitting time were adversely associated with general health questionnaire-12 assessed mental well-being in women. Computer use only was found to be adversely associated with mental well-being in men.

Conclusion

Sedentary behaviour may be adversely associated with mental well-being in employed adults. The association may be moderated by gender.

Keywords

Sedentary behaviourSitting timeMental well-beingEffect modification

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew J. Atkin
    • 1
    • 3
  • Emma Adams
    • 1
  • Fiona C. Bull
    • 1
  • Stuart J. H. Biddle
    • 2
  1. 1.British Heart Foundation National Centre for Physical Activity and Health, School of Sport, Exercise and Health SciencesLoughborough UniversityLoughboroughUK
  2. 2.School of Sport, Exercise and Health SciencesLoughborough UniversityLoughboroughUK
  3. 3.UKCRC Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), Institute of Public Health, University of CambridgeCambridgeUK