Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 109–122

Not Worth the Fuss After All? Cross-sectional and Prospective Data on Violent Video Game Influences on Aggression, Visuospatial Cognition and Mathematics Ability in a Sample of Youth

  • Christopher J. Ferguson
  • Adolfo Garza
  • Jessica Jerabeck
  • Raul Ramos
  • Mariza Galindo
Empirical Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10964-012-9803-6

Cite this article as:
Ferguson, C.J., Garza, A., Jerabeck, J. et al. J Youth Adolescence (2013) 42: 109. doi:10.1007/s10964-012-9803-6

Abstract

The United States Supreme Court’s recent decision relating to violent video games revealed divisions within the scientific community about the potential for negative effects of such games as well as the need for more, higher quality research. Scholars also have debated the potential for violent games to have positive effects such as on visuospatial cognition or math ability. The current study sought to extend previous literature by using well-validated clinical outcome measures for relevant constructs, which have generally been lacking in past research. Cross-section data on aggression, visuospatial cognition, and math achievement were available for a sample of 333 (51.7 % female) mostly Hispanic youth (mean age = 12.76). Prospective 1-year data on aggression and school GPA were available for 143 (46.2 % female) of those youth. Results from both sets of analysis revealed that exposure to violent game had neither short-term nor long-term predictive influences on either positive or negative outcomes. A developmental analysis of the cross-sectional data revealed that results did not differ across age categories of older children, preadolescents or adolescents. Analysis of effect sizes largely ruled out Type II error as a possible explanation for null results. Suggestions for new directions in the field of video game research are proffered.

Keywords

Video games Aggression Cognition Child development Adolescence 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. Ferguson
    • 1
  • Adolfo Garza
    • 1
  • Jessica Jerabeck
    • 1
  • Raul Ramos
    • 1
  • Mariza Galindo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and CommunicationTexas A&M International UniversityLaredoUSA