Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 50, Issue 5, pp 858–861

Clinical Utility of Videofluorography with Concomitant Tensilon Administration in the Diagnosis of Bulbar Myasthenia Gravis

Authors

  • Darren C. Schwartz
    • Departments of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology & HepatologyUniversity of Wisconsin Medical School
  • Andrew J. Waclawik
    • Department of NeurologyUniversity of Wisconsin Medical School
    • William S. Middleton Veterans Affairs Hospital
  • Sumit N. Ringwala
    • Departments of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology & HepatologyUniversity of Wisconsin Medical School
    • Departments of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology & HepatologyUniversity of Wisconsin Medical School
    • Department of NeurologyUniversity of Wisconsin Medical School
    • University of Wisconsin Medical School
Case Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10620-005-2653-2

Cite this article as:
Schwartz, D.C., Waclawik, A.J., Ringwala, S.N. et al. Dig Dis Sci (2005) 50: 858. doi:10.1007/s10620-005-2653-2

Abstract

Myasthenia gravis (MG) classically presents with ocular, bulbar, and predominantly proximal muscle weakness. Isolated bulbar symptoms occur in less than 25% of cases and can mimic stroke (1–3). If left untreated, MG can lead to significant morbidity and mortality, including myasthenic crisis and recurrent aspiration pneumonia. We describe a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with isolated bulbar symptoms. We used a novel approach to diagnosis which included a videofluorographic swallow study with concomitant Tensilon (edrophonium) injection.

Key Words

myasthenia gravis videofluorography bulbar Tensilon dysphagia

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005