Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 469–480

Evidence of Broad Deficits in Emotion Regulation Associated with Chronic Worry and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Authors

    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Massachusetts Boston
    • National Center for PTSD, Behavioral Science DivisionVA Boston Healthcare System (116B-5)
  • Lizabeth Roemer
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Massachusetts Boston
    • Department of PsychologyBoston University
  • Matthew T. Tull
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Massachusetts Boston
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Maryland
  • Latanya Rucker
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Massachusetts Boston
    • B & D Behavioral Health Services
  • Douglas S. Mennin
    • Department of PsychologyYale University
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10608-006-9055-4

Cite this article as:
Salters-Pedneault, K., Roemer, L., Tull, M. et al. Cogn Ther Res (2006) 30: 469. doi:10.1007/s10608-006-9055-4

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between emotion regulation deficits and GAD-related outcomes in an analogue sample. Consistent with hypotheses, general emotion dysregulation was associated with reports of chronic worry and with analogue GAD status. Also, specific regulation deficits, including deficits in emotional clarity, acceptance of emotions, ability to engage in goal directed behaviors when distressed, impulse control, and access to effective regulation strategies, were associated with worry and analogue GAD above and beyond variance contributed by negative affectivity. These findings provide additional preliminary evidence for an emotion regulation deficit model of GAD and are discussed in terms of clinical implications and directions for future research.

Keywords

Generalized anxiety disorderAnxiety disordersEmotion regulationEmotionsAnxiety

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006