Climatic Change

, Volume 100, Issue 3, pp 733–756

Persistent multi-decadal Greenland temperature fluctuation through the last millennium

Authors

    • Scripps Institution of OceanographyUniversity of California, San Diego
    • Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES)
  • Jeffrey P. Severinghaus
    • Scripps Institution of OceanographyUniversity of California, San Diego
  • Jean-Marc Barnola
    • Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’EnvironnementCNRS
  • Kenji Kawamura
    • Scripps Institution of OceanographyUniversity of California, San Diego
    • National Institute of Polar Research
  • Tara Carter
    • Department of AnthropologyUniversity of California, San Diego
  • Tosiyuki Nakaegawa
    • Meteorological Research InstituteJapan Meteorological Agency
Open AccessArticle

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-009-9689-9

Cite this article as:
Kobashi, T., Severinghaus, J.P., Barnola, J. et al. Climatic Change (2010) 100: 733. doi:10.1007/s10584-009-9689-9

Abstract

Future Greenland temperature evolution will affect melting of the ice sheet and associated global sea-level change. Therefore, understanding Greenland temperature variability and its relation to global trends is critical. Here, we reconstruct the last 1,000 years of central Greenland surface temperature from isotopes of N2 and Ar in air bubbles in an ice core. This technique provides constraints on decadal to centennial temperature fluctuations. We found that northern hemisphere temperature and Greenland temperature changed synchronously at periods of ~20 years and 40–100 years. This quasi-periodic multi-decadal temperature fluctuation persisted throughout the last millennium, and is likely to continue into the future.

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2009