AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 480–490

A Brief Assessment of Learning for Orphaned and Abandoned Children in Low and Middle Income Countries

  • Karen O’Donnell
  • Robert Murphy
  • Jan Ostermann
  • Max Masnick
  • Rachel A. Whetten
  • Elisabeth Madden
  • Nathan M. Thielman
  • Kathryn Whetten
  • The Positive Outcomes for Orphans (POFO) Research Team
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-011-9940-z

Cite this article as:
O’Donnell, K., Murphy, R., Ostermann, J. et al. AIDS Behav (2012) 16: 480. doi:10.1007/s10461-011-9940-z

Abstract

Assessment of children’s learning and performance in low and middle income countries has been critiqued as lacking a gold standard, an appropriate norm reference group, and demonstrated applicability of assessment tasks to the context. This study was designed to examine the performance of three nonverbal and one adapted verbal measure of children’s problem solving, memory, motivation, and attention across five culturally diverse sites. The goal was to evaluate the tests as indicators of individual differences affected by life events and care circumstances for vulnerable children. We conclude that the measures can be successfully employed with fidelity in non-standard settings in LMICs, and are associated with child age and educational experience across the settings. The tests can be useful in evaluating variability in vulnerable child outcomes.

Keywords

Orphans Learning Performance Low and middle income Tests 

Supplementary material

10461_2011_9940_MOESM1_ESM.doc (38 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 37 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen O’Donnell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Robert Murphy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Jan Ostermann
    • 1
  • Max Masnick
    • 1
  • Rachel A. Whetten
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Madden
    • 7
    • 8
  • Nathan M. Thielman
    • 1
    • 7
  • Kathryn Whetten
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • The Positive Outcomes for Orphans (POFO) Research Team
  1. 1.Center for Health Policy, Duke Global Health InstituteDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Terry Sanford Institute of Public PolicyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral SciencesDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  5. 5.Center for Child and Family HealthDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  6. 6.Department of Community and Family MedicineDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  7. 7.Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and International HealthDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  8. 8.Carnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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