Primates

, Volume 55, Issue 1, pp 89–99

Field immobilization for treatment of an unknown illness in a wild chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Gombe National Park, Tanzania: findings, challenges, and lessons learned

  • Elizabeth Lonsdorf
  • Dominic Travis
  • Richard Ssuna
  • Emma Lantz
  • Michael Wilson
  • Kathryn Gamble
  • Karen Terio
  • Fabian Leendertz
  • Bernhard Ehlers
  • Brandon Keele
  • Beatrice Hahn
  • Thomas Gillespie
  • Joel Pond
  • Jane Raphael
  • Anthony Collins
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10329-013-0372-4

Cite this article as:
Lonsdorf, E., Travis, D., Ssuna, R. et al. Primates (2014) 55: 89. doi:10.1007/s10329-013-0372-4

Abstract

Infectious diseases are widely presumed to be one of the greatest threats to ape conservation in the wild. Human diseases are of particular concern, and the costs and benefits of human presence in protected areas with apes are regularly debated. While numerous syndromes with fatal outcomes have recently been described, precise identification of pathogens remains difficult. These diagnostic difficulties are compounded by the fact that direct veterinary intervention on wild apes is quite rare. Here we present the unique case of a wild chimpanzee at Gombe National Park that was observed with a severe illness and was subsequently examined and treated in the field. Multiple specimens were collected and tested with the aim of identifying the pathogen responsible for the illness. Our findings represent the first extensive screening of a living wild chimpanzee, yet despite our efforts, the cause and source of illness remain unknown. Nevertheless, our findings represent valuable baseline data for the ape conservation community and for comparison with other recent findings. In addition, we present the case here to demonstrate the planning required and multiple types of expertise necessary to maximize the amount of data obtained from such a rare intervention, and to provide lessons learned for future studies.

Keywords

ApesHealthDiseaseInterventionDiagnostics

Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre and Springer Japan 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth Lonsdorf
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dominic Travis
    • 2
    • 3
  • Richard Ssuna
    • 4
    • 5
  • Emma Lantz
    • 2
  • Michael Wilson
    • 6
  • Kathryn Gamble
    • 2
  • Karen Terio
    • 7
  • Fabian Leendertz
    • 8
  • Bernhard Ehlers
    • 8
  • Brandon Keele
    • 9
  • Beatrice Hahn
    • 10
  • Thomas Gillespie
    • 11
    • 12
  • Joel Pond
    • 2
  • Jane Raphael
    • 2
    • 13
    • 14
  • Anthony Collins
    • 13
    • 15
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyFranklin and Marshall CollegeLancasterUSA
  2. 2.Conservation ProgramsLincoln Park ZooChicagoUSA
  3. 3.College of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA
  4. 4.Ngamba Island Chimpanzee SanctuaryEntebbeUganda
  5. 5.Lilongwe SPCALilongweMalawi
  6. 6.Departments of Anthropology and Ecology, Evolution and BehaviorUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  7. 7.Zoo Pathology ProgramUniversity of IllinoisMaywoodUSA
  8. 8.Robert Koch InstituteBerlinGermany
  9. 9.The AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, SAIC-Frederick Inc.National Cancer Institute-FrederickFrederickUSA
  10. 10.University of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  11. 11.Department of Environmental Studies and Program in Population Biology, Ecology and EvolutionEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  12. 12.Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public HealthEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  13. 13.Gombe Stream Research CentreKigomaTanzania
  14. 14.Tanzania National ParksArushaTanzania
  15. 15.The Jane Goodall InstituteArlingtonUSA