Aquatic Sciences

, Volume 77, Issue 1, pp 161–170

A global boom in hydropower dam construction

  • Christiane Zarfl
  • Alexander E. Lumsdon
  • Jürgen Berlekamp
  • Laura Tydecks
  • Klement Tockner
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00027-014-0377-0

Cite this article as:
Zarfl, C., Lumsdon, A.E., Berlekamp, J. et al. Aquat Sci (2015) 77: 161. doi:10.1007/s00027-014-0377-0

Abstract

Human population growth, economic development, climate change, and the need to close the electricity access gap have stimulated the search for new sources of renewable energy. In response to this need, major new initiatives in hydropower development are now under way. At least 3,700 major dams, each with a capacity of more than 1 MW, are either planned or under construction, primarily in countries with emerging economies. These dams are predicted to increase the present global hydroelectricity capacity by 73 % to about 1,700 GW. Even such a dramatic expansion in hydropower capacity will be insufficient to compensate for the increasing electricity demand. Furthermore, it will only partially close the electricity gap, may not substantially reduce greenhouse gas emission (carbon dioxide and methane), and may not erase interdependencies and social conflicts. At the same time, it is certain to reduce the number of our planet’s remaining free-flowing large rivers by about 21 %. Clearly, there is an urgent need to evaluate and to mitigate the social, economic, and ecological ramifications of the current boom in global dam construction.

Keywords

BiodiversityEnergyRiver managementSustainabilityClimate change

Supplementary material

27_2014_377_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (3.5 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 3601 kb)
27_2014_377_MOESM2_ESM.xls (211 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (XLS 211 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Basel 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christiane Zarfl
    • 1
    • 4
  • Alexander E. Lumsdon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jürgen Berlekamp
    • 3
  • Laura Tydecks
    • 1
  • Klement Tockner
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland FisheriesBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Department of Biology, Chemistry and PharmacyFreie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Environmental Systems ResearchUniversity of OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany
  4. 4.Center for Applied GeosciencesEberhard Karls Universität TübingenTübingenGermany