Pure and Applied Geophysics

, Volume 168, Issue 11, pp 1989–2010

Field Survey of the 27 February 2010 Chile Tsunami

  • Hermann M. Fritz
  • Catherine M. Petroff
  • Patricio A. Catalán
  • Rodrigo Cienfuegos
  • Patricio Winckler
  • Nikos Kalligeris
  • Robert Weiss
  • Sergio E. Barrientos
  • Gianina Meneses
  • Carolina Valderas-Bermejo
  • Carl Ebeling
  • Athanassios Papadopoulos
  • Manuel Contreras
  • Rafael Almar
  • Juan Carlos Dominguez
  • Costas E. Synolakis
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00024-011-0283-5

Cite this article as:
Fritz, H.M., Petroff, C.M., Catalán, P.A. et al. Pure Appl. Geophys. (2011) 168: 1989. doi:10.1007/s00024-011-0283-5

Abstract

On 27 February 2010, a magnitude Mw = 8.8 earthquake occurred off the coast of Chile’s Maule region causing substantial damage and loss of life. Ancestral tsunami knowledge from the 1960 event combined with education and evacuation exercises prompted most coastal residents to spontaneously evacuate after the earthquake. Many of the tsunami victims were tourists in coastal campgrounds. The international tsunami survey team (ITST) was deployed within days of the event and surveyed 800 km of coastline from Quintero to Mehuín and the Pacific Islands of Santa María, Mocha, Juan Fernández Archipelago, and Rapa Nui (Easter). The collected survey data include more than 400 tsunami flow depth, runup and coastal uplift measurements. The tsunami peaked with a localized runup of 29 m on a coastal bluff at Constitución. The observed runup distributions exhibit significant variations on local and regional scales. Observations from the 2010 and 1960 Chile tsunamis are compared.

Keywords

Tsunami wave runup coastal uplift Chile South Pacific Ocean 

Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hermann M. Fritz
    • 1
  • Catherine M. Petroff
    • 2
  • Patricio A. Catalán
    • 3
  • Rodrigo Cienfuegos
    • 4
  • Patricio Winckler
    • 5
  • Nikos Kalligeris
    • 6
  • Robert Weiss
    • 7
  • Sergio E. Barrientos
    • 8
  • Gianina Meneses
    • 8
  • Carolina Valderas-Bermejo
    • 8
  • Carl Ebeling
    • 9
  • Athanassios Papadopoulos
    • 6
  • Manuel Contreras
    • 10
  • Rafael Almar
    • 4
  • Juan Carlos Dominguez
    • 4
  • Costas E. Synolakis
    • 11
    • 12
  1. 1.School of Civil and Environmental EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologySavannahUSA
  2. 2.LP4 Associates LLCMercer islandUSA
  3. 3.Departamento de Obras CivilesUniversidad Técnica Federico Santa MaríaValparaísoChile
  4. 4.Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental Escuela de IngenieríaPontificia Universidad Católica de ChileSantiagoChile
  5. 5.School of Ocean EngineeringUniversidad de ValparaísoValparaísoChile
  6. 6.Department of Environmental EngineeringTechnical University of CreteChaniaGreece
  7. 7.Department of Geology and GeophysicsTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  8. 8.Departamento de GeofísicaUniversidad de ChileSantiagoChile
  9. 9.Department of Earth and Planetary SciencesNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  10. 10.Departamento de Ingeniería Informática, Facultad de IngenieríaUniversidad de Playa AnchaValparaísoChile
  11. 11.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  12. 12.Hellenic Center for Marine ResearchAnavyssosGreece

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