B-Scan Ultrasonography of Ocular Trauma

  • Rasha Abbas

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This video presents the essential information for probe position and orientation followed by a variety of ultrasound cases in ocular trauma. Simple injury to severe injury with complications and how to identify conditions with ultrasound B-scan is covered throughout the video segments. General ophthalmologists, ophthalmic surgeons, residents and ultrasound and ultrasound biomicroscopy specialists will find this video to be a clear, concise guide for handling ultrasound B-scan in routine and complex ocular trauma cases.

Introduction

This video presents the essential information for probe position and orientation followed by a variety of ultrasound cases in ocular trauma.

About The Author

Rasha Abbas

Dr. Rasha Abbas is a Consultant of Ophthalmology, ultrasound specialist and Head of the Ophthalmic Ultrasound Department at the Al Watany Eye Hospital in Cairo, Egypt. Dr Abbas has over 20 years of experience in ultrasound (A & B Scan and Ultrasound Biomicroscopy) and manages more than 1000 clinical cases per year. Dr Abbas has participated as a speaker and trainer in national and international ophthalmology meetings and courses to share her extensive knowledge of ultrasound of eye and orbit in routine and rare cases.

 

About this video

Author(s)
Rasha Abbas
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-09568-9
Online ISBN
978-3-031-09568-9
Total duration
26 min
Publisher
Springer, Cham
Copyright information
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022

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Video Transcript

I’m Rasha Abbas, consultant ophthalmologist and head of ultrasound department in Watany Eye Hospital, Egypt. I’m the author of Ophthalmic Ultrasonography and Ultrasound Biomicroscopy– A Clinical Guide. In this video, we’ll start with a brief introduction of how to do an ultrasound examination using different probe position and orientation. Then we will discuss how trauma can affect different parts of the eye, starting from lens trauma, then the changes in the vitreous and retina happen after trauma, followed by how to discover and localize a foreign body, and, finally, ultrasound examination of posterior perforation.

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