Vitrectomy for Coats Disease

  • Jonathan Sears
  • Joseph Boss

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Coats disease is a generally unilateral, non-hereditary condition associated with abnormal blood vessels. Depending on the severity of exudation, associated exudative retinal detachments can occur in which are often managed surgically. This video series is an overview of the surgical management of Coats disease associated retinal detachments. Watching this series of videos will give you a broad overview and insight into various techniques for approaching Coats disease associated retinal detachments.

Introduction

There are many considerations regarding the initial workup, counseling, and the appropriate surgical steps for successful outcomes. This educational series will provide an overview including pre-operative considerations, intraoperative considerations such as port placement, lens decisions, posterior hyaloid separation and vitrectomy, various methods to drain subretinal fluid to apply thermal treatment, and tamponade techniques. These instructional videos will highlight techniques including an overview of pediatric vitrectomy in which includes the authors’ preferred internal perfluorocarbon assisted external drainage technique to attach the retina in order to apply much needed thermal treatment.

About The Author

Jonathan Sears

Dr. Jonathan Sears is a physician scientist trained in molecular biology as a medical student at Yale in the Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, and in Vitreoretinal surgery at the Emory Eye Center, Emory University. His lab studies stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) as a molecular mechanism to prevent oxygen induced pathology of the severely preterm. His lab is the first to demonstrate that making HIF active in hyperoxia can simultaneously prevent both retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preclinical animal models, and that the liver alone can be induced to protect retinal blood vessels from oxygen induced growth suppression. His clinical practice concentrates on pediatric retinal disease. He has definitively demonstrated that biphasic oxygen standards prevent ROP and that scleral buckling is not necessary as an adjunct to vitrectomy for Stage 4a/b detachment. Dr. Sears practices at the Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, since 1998.

 
Joseph Boss

Dr. Joseph Boss completed his medical school education at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine in Grand Rapids, MI. Subsequently, he completed his ophthalmology residency at Kresge Eye Institute-Wayne State University in Detroit, where he was selected to be chief resident. Dr. Boss then completed his 2-year vitreoretinal surgery fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic Cole Eye Institute. Dr. Boss currently works as an adult and pediatric retina specialist at Retina Specialists of Michigan in Grand Rapids, MI.

 

About this video

Author(s)
Jonathan Sears
Joseph Boss
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-37009-1
Online ISBN
978-3-030-37009-1
Total duration
11 min
Publisher
Springer, Cham
Copyright information
© The Author(s) 2019

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Video Transcript

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Hello, my name is Dr. Joseph Boss with Retina Specialists of Michigan. And my collaborator is Dr. Jonathan Sears with the Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic. This video is an overview of the surgical management of Coats’ disease and associated retinal detachments. This video will provide an overview, including preoperative considerations. Intraoperative considerations, such as port placement, lens decisions, posterior hyaloid separation and vitrectomy, various methods to drain subretinal fluid to apply thermal treatment, and tamponade techniques. Watching this series of videos will give you a broad overview and insight into various techniques for approaching Coats’ and associated retinal detachments. I do hope this instructional video series provides useful information for you. Thank you so much.