Advanced Features for Adobe’s CC Libraries Enhance Your Workflow and Web Projects with Adobe Software

  • Jennifer Harder

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This step-by-step video will show you how to leverage the power of the Creative Cloud Libraries panel and how it can streamline your work as a freelancer or as a member of a larger team. You will look at Adobe desktop apps that have the panel or access to the panel. During this discussion you’ll briefly see what each can or cannot import and export with the CC Libraries panel.

This video focuses on importing assets with Bridge and the Creative Cloud Console; collaborating and sharing your CC libraries; and touches on Animate, Dreamweaver, After Effects, Premiere Pro, XD, Dimension, and Fresco.

While the Creative Cloud Libraries panel and console have been available in several versions of Adobe, their look and arrangement have changed over time. Adobe beginners or those who have not used the panel will discover how useful it is and save time when working between several Adobe programs to complete complex layout projects.

What You Will Learn

  • Use Bridge and Creative Cloud Console to import assets such as animations, 3D items, videos, and templates

  • How to collaborate with a team through the CC libraries

  • Access graphics from Adobe Stock

  • How to integrate your work with other Adobe software for web projects, such as Animate, Dreamweaver, and Premiere Pro

Who This Video Is For

Students, graphic designers, and corporate administrators who need to create documents for events. This video is a beginner to intermediate level, and will be most helpful to viewers with some basic experience in Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign.

This video will show you how to leverage the power of the Adobe CC Libraries panel. It focuses on importing assets with Bridge and the Creative Cloud Console; and collaborating and sharing your CC libraries. This video also touches on the integration of other Adobe apps.

About The Author

Jennifer Harder

Jennifer Harder has worked in the graphic design industry for over ten years. She has a degree in graphic communications and is currently teaching Acrobat, InDesign, and Dreamweaver courses at Langara College. As a freelancer, Jennifer frequently works with Adobe PDFs to help enhance websites. She enjoys talking about Adobe software and her interests include writing, illustration, and working on her websites.

 

Supporting material

View source code at GitHub.

About this video

Author(s)
Jennifer Harder
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4842-6091-3
Online ISBN
978-1-4842-6091-3
Total duration
1 hr 12 min
Publisher
Apress
Copyright information
© Jennifer Harder 2020

Related content

Video Transcript

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Advanced Features for Adobe’s CC Libraries, Enhance Your Workflow and Web Projects with Adobe Software–

Welcome to my video on the topic “Advanced Features for Adobe’s CC Libraries, Enhance Your Workflow and Web Projects with Adobe Software.” My name is Jennifer Harder. I’m a book and video author for Apress and an instructor at a local college in Vancouver, BC. In this video, we will look at the Adobe Desktop apps that have the Libraries panel and access to the assets. Then I’ll briefly demonstrate how each app can or cannot import or export assets with the CC Libraries panel into another Adobe Desktop app.

The options of what assets each Adobe app and the Creative Cloud Desktop Console can access will be evident when each app is opened. In each segment, I will go into more detail as I work on part of a project in that specific app. In this video, we will focus on working with the Desktop apps Bridge, the Creative Cloud Desktop Console, Photoshop’s Adobe Stock, and later, Animate and Dreamweaver. Just like Photoshop, these applications appear to be the most integrated and easiest to use.

I will demonstrate projects which involve an animation or a web page that contains text and other assets. Projects will include the use of assets of colors, color themes, gradients, brushes, text, character styles, paragraph styles, layer styles and graphics, Smart Objects, and layers from my own computer and those accessed via Adobe Stock. Bridge and Creative Cloud Desktop Console will be looked at in regard to acquiring and sharing graphics and lesser-known assets.

Later, we will look at how to access a graphic asset from Adobe Stock using Photoshop. Afterwards, I will also mention how Animate and Dreamweaver can also access some assets, such as a color or an animation stored in the CC Libraries panel for web-related projects– finally, a very brief mention of other Adobe programs you can explore on your own with the Libraries panel, such as After Effects, Premiere Pro, XD, Dimension and Fresco.

If you haven’t already, please make sure to check out my video in this series, “Introduction to Adobe’s CC Libraries in Photoshop,” as it will give a good introduction to what is the Creative Cloud Library’s panel and on how to work with the CC Libraries panel in Photoshop, as well as in the upcoming Desktop apps we will be discussing. This will be useful for when you work on your own projects by yourself or with others online.

In addition, if you are working with Illustrator and InDesign as well, make sure to check out the video, “Introduction to Adobe’s CC Libraries in Illustrator and InDesign” for tips and tricks on working in these desktop apps and the CC Libraries panel.