The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Agricultural Economics

  • C. Ford Runge
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_655

Abstract

Agricultural economics arose in the late 19th century, combined the theory of the firm with marketing and organization theory, and developed throughout the 20th century largely as an empirical branch of general economics. The discipline was closely linked to empirical applications of mathematical statistics and made early and significant contributions to econometric methods. From the 1960s, as agricultural sectors in the OECD countries contracted, agricultural economists were drawn to the development problems of poor countries, to the trade and macroeconomic policy implications of agriculture in richer countries, and to a variety of issues in production, consumption, environmental and resource economics.

Keywords

Agricultural economics Agricultural subsidies Agriculture and economic development American Agricultural Economics Association American Economic Association American Farm Economics Association Australian Agricultural Economics Society Bellman’s dynamic programming principle Black, J. D. Boulding, K. Center for Agricultural Research and Development Chayanov, A. Chenery, H. Clark, J. B. Cobweb theorem Common property resources Commons, R. Computable general equilibrium models Corn–hog cycle Cournot, A. A. Diminishing returns Ely, R. T. Environmental economics European Association of Agricultural Economists Ezekiel, M. Factor mobility Fisheries General equilibrium Georgescu-Roegen, N. Griliches, Z. Heady, E.; Health Hedonic prices Hicks, J. R. Horizontal integration Human capital Index numbers Indicative planning Industrial organization Innovation Input–output analysis Johnson, D. Gale Land Land grant model Laur School (Switzerland) Leontief, W. Neoclassical economics Neoclassical synthesis Nourse, E. Nutrition Optimization theory Physiocracy Pollution Poverty alleviation Price stabilization Production economics Property rights Quesnay, F. Recursive models Recursive programming Rent Ricardo, D. Risk preferences Samuelson, P. A. Schultz, T. W. Sering School (Germany) Serpieri School (Italy) Shackle, G. L. S. Smith, A. Spatial economics Species loss Stigler, G. Stochastic programming methods Subjective probability Supply controls Surplus production Taylor, H. C. technical change Thünen, J. H. von Treadmill hypothesis Veblen, T. Vertical integration Warren, G. Waugh, F. Working, E. Working, H. Young, A 

JEL Classifications

Q00 
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Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Ford Runge
    • 1
  1. 1.