The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Autarky

  • David Evans
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_574

Abstract

Autarky means self-sufficiency, especially economic self-sufficiency. The term appears most frequently in economic literature, both as a theoretical construct deployed in the theory of comparative advantage, and as a policy of economic self-sufficiency.

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Evans
    • 1
  1. 1.