The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

European Monetary Integration

  • David G. Mayes
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2984

Abstract

This article explores the development of Economic and Monetary Union in Europe from the Second World War through to the end of 2010. It concentrates primarily on the earlier part of the process and contrasts what has been implemented since 1999 with its antecedents and with the prescriptions suggested by economic theory. It covers the work of the Werner Committee, the European Monetary System (including its Exchange Rate Mechanism), the provisions of the Maastricht Treaty, the Stability and Growth Pact and their implementation.

Keywords

Delors Committee Economic and Monetary Union Europe European Monetary System Exchange Rate Mechanism Integration Maastricht Treaty Monetary union Stability and Growth Pact Werner Report 

JEL Classifications

E42 F15 N14 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Mayes
    • 1
  1. 1.