The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

United States, Economics in (1885–1945)

  • Bradley W. Bateman
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2676

Abstract

The history of American economics following the founding of the American Economic Association in 1885 is not a simple linear narrative of the triumph of neoclassical economics over historical economics. On the contrary, American economics remained a highly plural enterprise until the 1930s. Although there was strife in the 1880s over the proper method of doing economic research, this strife quickly gave way to a long period of détente. Only following the secularization of economics in the 1920s and the advent of the synthesis of neoclassical and Keynesian economics in the 1940s did this pluralism end.

Keywords

Adams, H. C. American Economic Association Anderson, B. Arrow, K. J. Bain, J. Catchings, W. Chamberlin, E.H. Clark, J. B. Clark, J. M. Commons, J. R. Cowles Commission Cowles, A. Currie, L. Dantzig, G. B. Douglas, P. Dunbar, C. Econometric Society Elym, R. T. Fetter, F. Fisher, I. Foster, W. T German Historical School Gibbs, W. Gilbert, M. Great Depression Haavelmo, T. Hadley, A. T. Hamilton, W. Hotelling, H. Institutionalism Knight, F. H. Koopmans, T. C. Kuznets, S. Laissez-faire Laughlin, J. L. Marginal School Mason, E. Mitchell, W. C. National Bureau of Economic Research Neoclassical economics New Deal Newcomb, S. Patten, S. N. Pollak Foundation for Economic Research (USA) Probabilistic revolution Progressivism Real-bills doctrine Samuelson, P. A. Seligman, E. R. A. Snyder, C. Sumner, W. G. Sumner, W. G. Taussig, F. W. Underconsumptionism United States, economics in Veblen, T. I. Walker, F. A. Warburton, C. Willis, H.P. Young, A. A 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bradley W. Bateman
    • 1
  1. 1.